X



There are people, who, when they become angry and offend others, demand first that nothing be held against them, and second, that they be pitied because they are prey to such violent attacks. Human arrogance can go that far.
—Nietzsche, Human, All Too Human, aphorism 358 (via eccenohomo)

(Source: thetolerantleft)

tagreader:

How would you feel?

#gaza #gazaunderattack #prayforgaza

“If you really believe that representation doesn’t matter, then why the fuck are you threatened by it? If not seeing yourself depicted in stories has no negative psychological impact - if the breakdown of who we see on screen has no bearing on wider social issues - then what would it matter if nine stories out of ten were suddenly all about queer brown women? No big, right? It wouldn’t change anything important; just a few superficial details. Because YOU can identify with ANYONE.

So I guess the problem is that you just don’t want to. Because deep down, you think it’ll make stories worse. And why is that? Oh, yeah: because it means they wouldn’t all be about YOU.”

birdprinxe:

hylianears:

micdotcom:

Canadian music festival takes huge step against Native appropriation

Follow micdotcom 

From their announcement:

For various reasons, Bass Coast Festival is banning feathered war bonnets, or anything resembling them, onsite. Our security team will be enforcing this policy.

We understand why people are attracted to war bonnets. They have a magnificent aesthetic. But their spiritual, cultural and aesthetic significance cannot be separated.

Bass Coast Festival takes place on indigenous land and we respect the dignity of aboriginal people. We have consulted with aboriginal people in British Columbia on this issue and we feel our policy aligns with their views and wishes regarding the subject. Their opinion is what matters to us.

Hell yes!!! Hopefully more festivals start adopting this policy!

There is little precedent for fat androgyny. Generally our androgynous icons are svelte and lacking in secondary sex characteristics. David Bowie, Tilda Swinton, Katherine Hepburn; these small-bodied, predominately white figures of androgyny have created an aesthetic with little room for deviation. This means that for those of us with bodies that do not conform to traditional standards of androgyny, we are often misread and misunderstood, even in queer spaces.

Fat Queer Tells All: On Fatness and Gender Flatness - By Allie Shyer (via cassket)

this is interesting to me, how bodies are read.

(via lipstickmata)

My whole life all I wanted was to be androgynous, to slip through spaces in lean suits. To be everything all the time, to pass as beautiful no matter what. But I never could.

(Source: otipemisiwak)

Men and Women Can't Be "Just Friends"

(Source: serpiente-venenosa)

Six simple rituals:

1. Drink a glass of water when you wake up. Your body loses water while you sleep, so you’re naturally dehydrated in the morning. A glass of water when you wake helps start your day fresh.

2. Define your top 3. Every morning ask yourself, “What are the top three most important tasks that I will complete today?” Prioritizes your day accordingly and don’t sleep until the Top 3 are complete.

3. The 50/10 Rule. Solo-task and do more faster by working in 50/10 increments. Use a timer to work for 50 minutes on only one important task with 10 minute breaks in between. Spend your 10 minutes getting away from your desk, going outside, calling friends, meditating, or grabbing a glass of water.

4. Move and sweat daily. Regular movement keeps us healthy and alert. It boosts energy and mood, and relieves stress.

5. Express gratitude. Gratitude fosters happiness. Each morning, think of at least five things you’re thankful for. In times of stress, pause and reflect on these things.

6. Reflect daily. Bring closure to your day through 10 minutes of reflection. Asks yourself, “What went well?” and “What needs improvement?”

Six simple rituals:

1. Drink a glass of water when you wake up. Your body loses water while you sleep, so you’re naturally dehydrated in the morning. A glass of water when you wake helps start your day fresh.

2. Define your top 3. Every morning ask yourself, “What are the top three most important tasks that I will complete today?” Prioritizes your day accordingly and don’t sleep until the Top 3 are complete.

3. The 50/10 Rule. Solo-task and do more faster by working in 50/10 increments. Use a timer to work for 50 minutes on only one important task with 10 minute breaks in between. Spend your 10 minutes getting away from your desk, going outside, calling friends, meditating, or grabbing a glass of water.

4. Move and sweat daily. Regular movement keeps us healthy and alert. It boosts energy and mood, and relieves stress.

5. Express gratitude. Gratitude fosters happiness. Each morning, think of at least five things you’re thankful for. In times of stress, pause and reflect on these things.

6. Reflect daily. Bring closure to your day through 10 minutes of reflection. Asks yourself, “What went well?” and “What needs improvement?”

Anonymous asks: Is it more common to native women to go braless than in other women?

fyeahindigenousfashion:

Even though I’m offended by this question, I’m going to humor you to dispel whatever “Native Americans are all hippies in touch with Nature////Native women are all hypersexual earth goddesses” myth you’re working from here:

The modern bra was invented in 1889, and wasn’t really popular until after WWI (corsets went out of fashion when metal became expensive due to the war). So obviously Native women pre-1889 were not wearing what we now think of as bras, because no one was. They didn’t exist. Prior to the invention of the modern bra, some Native women wore corsets, depending on their contact with settlers. Many girls in residential schools were forced to wear corsets, and taught that it was improper and distasteful to go out into the world without one. Many Native women that needed the approval of settlers for their political/personal agendas (policymaking, access to education, social status, etc) wore corsets because they had to to be considered respectable. And maybe some just liked how it looked. 

I would imagine that Native women have been wearing modern bras with as much frequency as any other race, because our fashion tastes change with the times, just like any other race. We also are not exempt from the colonial misogyny and sexism in the world that penalizes women who choose to not wear bras (it’s often still considered unprofessional, weird, gross, etc) or dress to Western standards of beauty. 

-A

Cookbooks

the-rain-monster:

A NYC grad student working on food stamps for her thesis has released a free cookbook for those living on $4/day.